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  • Title: The Honest Whore, Part 1 (Quarto 1, 1604)
  • Editor: Joost Daalder
  • ISBN: 978-1-55058-490-5

    Copyright Digital Renaissance Editions. This text may be freely used for educational, non-profit purposes; for all other uses contact the Editor.
    Authors: Thomas Dekker, Thomas Middleton
    Editor: Joost Daalder
    Peer Reviewed

    The Honest Whore, Part 1 (Quarto 1, 1604)

    THE HONEST WHORE .
    Fu st . Sfoot Coz, a good ie st, did you heare him? he told
    me in my eare, I was a flat foole, an A s s e, a Gull, and Ile
    thrumb you: doe you see this Cambrick sir?
    Wi. What, not my men, I hope?
    1325 Fu st . No, not your men, but one of your men ifayth.
    1. Pr. I pray sir, come hither, what say you to this? here
    an excellent good one.
    Fu st . I marry, this likes me well, cut me off some halfe (score yards.
    2. Pr. Let your whores cut, yare an impudent coxcomb,
    1330you get none, & yet Ile thrum you.- A very good Cam-
    brick sir.
    Fu st . Agen, agen, as God iudge me: Sfoot, Coz, they
    stand thrūming here with me all day, & yet I get nothing.
    1. Pr. A word I pray sir, you mu st not be angry, prentices
    1335haue hote blouds, young fellowes,- What say you to this
    piece? looke you, tis so delicate, so soft, so euen, so fine a
    thrid, that a Lady may weare it.
    Fu st . Sfoot I thinke so, if a Knight marry my Punck, a
    Lady shall weare it: cut me off 20. yards: th'art an hone st (lad.
    1340 1. Pr. Not without mony, gull, & ile thrū you to.
    Omn. Gull, weele thrum you.
    Fu st . O Lord, si ster, did you not heare something cry
    thrum? zounds your men here make a plaine A s s e of me.
    Wi. What, to my face so impudent?
    1345 Geor. I, in a cause so hone st, weele not suffer
    Our ma sters goods to vani sh mony le s s e.
    Wife. You will not suffer them.
    2. Pr. No, and you may blu sh,
    In going about to vex so mild a bre st,
    1350As is our ma sters. Wi. Take away those pieces.
    Cozen, I giue them freely.
    Fu st . Ma s s e, and Ile take em as freely.
    Om. Weele make you lay em down agen more freely.
    Wi. Help, help, my brother wilbe murdered. Enter Can.
    1355 Cand. How now, what coyle is here? forbeare, I say.
    Geor. He cals vs Flatcaps, and abuses vs.
    Can. Why, sirs? do such examples flow from me?
    Wi. They are of your keeping sir, alas poore brother.
    Fu st . I