Digital Renaissance Editions

Become a FriendSign in

Toolbox

Editorial Board

Coordinating Editor

Brett Greatley-Hirsch, University of Leeds

General Textual Editors

Eleanor Lowe, Oxford Brookes University

Sarah Neville, The Ohio State University

Will Sharpe, Shakespeare Institute, University of Birmingham

Editorial Board

Michael Best, University of Victoria

Hugh Craig, University of Newcastle

Janelle Jenstad, University of Victoria

Ian Lancashire, University of Toronto

Helen Ostovich, McMaster University

Chris Wortham, University of Notre Dame Australia

Board Member Profiles

Michael Best, University of Victoria

Michael Best is Professor Emeritus of English at the University of Victoria, British Columbia, and Coordinating Editor of the Internet Shakespeare Editions. Michael’s publications include: Shakespeare on the Art of Love (2008), and two CD-ROMs on Shakespeare’s Life and Times (1995) and A Shakespeare Suite (2003); editions of The Book of Secrets of Albertus Magnus (1973), Gervase Markham’s The English Housewife (1985), and Shakespeare’s King John (forthcoming); invited essay contributions to An Oxford Guide to Shakespeare (2003) and the Blackwell Concise Companion to Shakespeare and the Text (2007); as well as numerous articles in scholarly journals. He serves on the editorial board of Borrowers & Lenders, and on the advisory boards of Multicultural Shakespeare and the Thomson–Gale Shakespeare Collection.

Hugh Craig, University of Newcastle

Hugh Craig is Professor of English, Director of the Centre for Literary and Linguistic Computing, and Director of the Centre for 21st Century Humanities at the University of Newcastle, Australia. Hugh’s publications include: monographs on Ben Jonson (1990) and Sir John Harington (1985); a co-edited collection of essays, Shakespeare, Computers and the Mystery of Authorship (2008); invited essay contributions to the Blackwell Companion to Digital Humanities (2004) and Tudor England: An Encyclopedia (2001); as well as numerous articles in scholarly journals. He serves on the advisory board of Digital Studies/Le Champ Numèrique and on the executive committee of the Australasian Association for Digital Humanities.

Brett Greatley-Hirsch, University of Leeds

Brett Greatley-Hirsch is University Academic Fellow in Textual Studies and Digital Editing at the University of Leeds. He is a Co-Editor of the Routledge journal Shakespeare, and general editor of the Bibliography of Editions of Early English Drama. He previously served on the executive committees of the Australian and New Zealand Shakespeare Association (as Vice President, 2010-2012), and the Australasian Association for Digital Humanities (as Treasurer, 2014). With Hugh Craig, he is the author of Style, Computers, and Early Modern Drama: Beyond Authorship (Cambridge University Press, 2017). His current projects include an edition of Fair Em (with Kevin Quarmby) for Digital Renaissance Editions, an edition of Hyde Park for the Collected Works of James Shirley (Oxford University Press), and a monograph on the editing and publishing of Renaissance plays since the eighteenth century.

Janelle Jenstad, University of Victoria

Janelle Jenstad is Associate Professor of English at the University of Victoria. She directs The Map of Early Modern London (MoEML), a SSHRC-funded project that maps the streets, sites, and significant boundaries of late sixteenth-century and early seventeenth-century London (1560-1640). MoEML is producing a georeferenced critical edition of the Agas map, an encyclopedia of early modern London, an XML library of literary texts, and a versioned edition of Stow’s 1598, 1603, 1618, and 1633 Survey of London. In 2011, she was appointed Assistant Coordinating Editor of the Internet Shakespeare Editions. Her publications include articles and chapters in Elizabethan Theatre, The Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies, Early Modern Literary Studies, Shakespeare Bulletin, The Silver Society Journal, Institutional Culture in Early Modern Society (Brill), Shakespeare, Language and the Stage (Arden Shakespeare), Approaches to Teaching Othello (MLA), Performing Maternity in Early Modern England (Ashgate), New Directions in the Geohumanities: Art, Text, and History at the Edge of Place (Routledge), and Teaching Early Modern English Literature from the Archives (MLA, forthcoming).

Ian Lancashire, University of Toronto

Ian Lancashire is Professor of English at the University of Toronto. Ian is the Editor of Representative Poetry On-Line, Renaissance Electronic Texts, and Lexicons of Early Modern English. In addition to his editorial work, his publications include numerous book chapters and journal articles. He serves on editorial boards of Early Modern Literary Studies, the Records of Early English Drama and the Internet Shakespeare Editions, as well as the advisory boards of Computing in the Humanities Working Papers, Digital Studies/Le Champ Numèrique, and the Society for Early English and Norse Electronic Texts.

Eleanor Lowe, Oxford Brookes University

Eleanor Lowe is Senior Lecturer in Drama in the Department of English and Modern Languages at Oxford Brookes University. Eleanor’s research interests in early modern drama are divided between textual editing and theatre practice. She edited two plays for the AHRC-funded project, Richard Brome Online (2010) and is preparing a critical edition of George Chapman’s A Humorous Day’s Mirth for Digital Renaissance Editions. She is also part of the editorial team currently working on the New Oxford Shakespeare edition, was an Associate Editor for the RSC Complete Works of William Shakespeare (2007), and has co-edited plays for Oxford’s forthcoming edition of Ford’s plays. Eleanor’s focus on the practical understanding of clothing and costume is based on research of original clothing in the V&A’s special collections and the construction of Renaissance clothing for clients including Shakespeare's Globe London. She has made contribution on clothing and the stage to Ben Jonson in Context (2010) and The Oxford Handbook to Middleton (2012), and is preparing a transcription of the Henrician Revels accounts for The Malone Society.

Sarah Neville, The Ohio State University

Sarah Neville is Assistant Professor of English at The Ohio State University, where she also holds a courtesy appointment in Theatre. In addition to being a general textual editor on the DRE, she is also an Assistant Editor for the New Oxford Shakespeare. While pursuing her doctoral research at the University of New Brunswick, Sarah was funded by fellowships from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC) and the Huntington Library, and worked as a Research Assistant on the Cambridge Works of Ben Jonson and the Early English Booktrade Database. Her articles and reviews have appeared in Shakespeare, Shakespeare Bulletin, The Shakespearean International Yearbook, and Variants: The Journal of European Textual Scholarship. A forthcoming essay, "Curating Scholarly Commentary in the Age of Google," examines the impact of digital technologies on traditional constructions of editorial authority. Prior to arriving at OSU, Sarah was an assistant professor in the English department of West Virginia University, where her feminist adaptation of 1 and 2 Henry IV was produced as part of the 2013-14 season of WVU’s College of Creative Arts. Her current book project uses methods of historical bibliography to consider the ways that books of botany contributed to the construction of scientific and medical authority in early modern England.

Helen Ostovich, McMaster University

Helen Ostovich is Professor of English at McMaster University. Helen is Editor of the journal Early Theatre, Editor of the Ashgate Studies in Performance and Early Modern Drama series, and a General Editor of the Revels Plays. Her publications include: critical editions of the plays of Ben Jonson for Longman Annotated Texts (1997), the Revels Plays (2001), and the Cambridge Works of Ben Jonson (forthcoming); critical editions of Richard Brome’s A Jovial Crew and The Late Lancashire Witches for Richard Brome Online (2010); a co-edited anthology of literary materals, Reading Early Modern Women (2004), and a co-edited critical edition of Shakespeare’s All’s Well That Ends Well for the Internet Shakespeare Editions (forthcoming); as well as numerous book chapters and articles in scholarly journals.

Will Sharpe, Shakespeare Institute, University of Birmingham

Will Sharpe is a Teaching Fellow at the Shakespeare Institute, University of Birmingham. He is currently editing the New Oxford Shakespeare editions of Hamlet, Much Ado About Nothing and Henry VIII. He was Associate Editor of the RSC William Shakespeare & Others: Collaborative Plays (2013), and contributed reviews to A Year of Shakespeare, a book-length compendium covering all of the plays performed as part of the World Shakespeare Festival in 2012. He has also taught at the University of Warwick and Nottingham Trent University, and completed postdoctoral work on the Cambridge edition of The Complete Works of Ben Jonson at the University of Leeds. He is a Chief Associate Editor of the RSC Shakespeare individual volumes series, for which he co-edited Cymbeline with Jonathan Bate.

Chris Wortham, University of Notre Dame Australia

Chris Wortham is Professor of Theatre Studies and English Literature and Associate Dean (Teaching and Learning) at the University of Notre Dame Australia, and Senior Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Western Australia. Chris is Founding President of the Perth Medieval and Renaissance Group, and Editor Emeritus of the journal Parergon. His publications include co-edited critical editions of Christopher Marlowe’s Doctor Faustus (1985), the poems of Andrew Marvell (2000), and the anonymous medieval play Everyman (1980), as well as numerous articles in scholarly journals. He serves on the advisory boards of Comparative Drama, Parergon, and Shakespeare in Southern Africa.