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  • Title: The Honest Whore, Part 2 (Quarto 1, 1630)
  • Editor: Joost Daalder
  • ISBN: 978-1-55058-490-5

    Copyright Digital Renaissance Editions. This text may be freely used for educational, non-profit purposes; for all other uses contact the Editor.
    Author: Thomas Dekker
    Editor: Joost Daalder
    Not Peer Reviewed

    The Honest Whore, Part 2 (Quarto 1, 1630)

    The Hone st Whore.
    He leueld all her thoughts, and made them fit:
    2100Now he'd marre all agen, to try his wit.
    Duke. It may be so too, for to turne a Harlot
    Hone st, it mu st be by strong Antidots,
    'Tis rare, as to see Panthers change their spots.
    And when she's once a Starre (fixed) and shines bright,
    2105Tho 'twere impiety then to dim her light,
    Because we see such Tapers seldome burne.
    Yet 'tis the pride and glory of some men,
    To change her to a blazing Starre agen,
    And it may be, Hipollito does no more.
    2110It cannot be, but y'are acquainted all
    With that same madne s s e of our Sonne-in-law,
    That dotes so on a Curtizan.
    Omnes. Yes, my Lord.
    Car. All the City thinkes he's a Whoremonger.
    2115 A st . Yet I warrant, he'll sweare, no man markes him.
    Ber. 'Tis like so, for when a man goes a wenching, is as if
    he had a strong stincking breath, euery one smells him out,
    yet he feeles it not, tho it be rancker then the sweat of six-
    teene Bearewarders.
    2120 Duke. I doubt then you haue all those stinking breaths,
    You might be all smelt out.
    Car. Troth my Lord, I thinke we are all as you ha bin in
    your youth when you went a Maying, we all loue to heare
    the Cuckoo sing vpon other mens Trees.
    2125 Duke. It's well yet you confe s s e: but Girle, thy bed
    Shall not be parted with a Curtizan--- 'tis strange,
    No frowne of mine, no frowne of the poore Lady,
    (My abused child, his wife) no care of fame,
    Of Honor, Heauen or Hell, no not that name
    2130Of Common Strumpet, can affright, or woo
    Him to abandon her; the Harlot does vndoe him,
    She has bewitched him, robd him of his shape,
    Turnd him into a bea st, his reason's lo st,
    You see he lookes wild, does he not?
    2135 Car. I ha noted new Moones

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