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  • Title: The Honest Whore, Part 2 (Quarto 1, 1630)
  • Editor: Joost Daalder
  • ISBN: 978-1-55058-490-5

    Copyright Digital Renaissance Editions. This text may be freely used for educational, non-profit purposes; for all other uses contact the Editor.
    Author: Thomas Dekker
    Editor: Joost Daalder
    Not Peer Reviewed

    The Honest Whore, Part 2 (Quarto 1, 1630)

    The Hone st Whore.
    1040 Orla. From a poore Gentlewoman, Madam, whom I serue.
    Infae . And whats your bu sine s s e?
    Orla. This, Madam: my poore Mi stris has a wa ste piece
    of ground, which is her owne by inheritance, and left to
    her by her mother; There's a Lord now that goes about,
    1045not to take it cleane from her, but to inclose it to himselfe,
    and to ioyne it to a piece of his Lord ships.
    Infae . What would she haue me doe in this?
    Orla. No more, Madam, but what one woman should
    doe for another in such a case. My Honourable Lord, your
    1050Husband would doe any thing in her behalfe, but shee had
    rather put her selfe into your hands, because you (a woman)
    may doe more with the Duke your Father.
    Infae . Where lyes this Land?
    Orl. Within a stones ca st of this place; my Mi stris, I think,
    1055would be content to let him enioy it after her decease, if
    that would serue his turne, so my Ma ster would yeeld too:
    but she cannot abide to heare that the Lord should meddle
    with it in her life time.
    Infae . Is she then married? why stirres not her Husband
    1060in it?
    Orl. Her Husband stirres in it vnder hand: but because
    the other is a great rich man, my Ma ster is loth to be seene
    in it too much.
    Infae . Let her in writing draw the cause at large:
    1065And I will moue the Duke.
    Orl. 'Tis set downe, Madam, here in blacke and white
    already: worke it so, Madam, that she may keepe her owne
    without di sturbance, grieuance, mole station, or medling of
    any other; and she be stowes this purse of gold on your La-
    1070dy ship.
    Infae . Old man, Ile pleade for her, but take no fees:
    Giue Lawyers them, I swim not in that flood,
    Ile touch no gold, till I haue done her good.
    Orl. I would all Proctors Clearkes were of your minde,
    1075I should law more among st them then I doe then; here, Ma-
    dam, is the suruey, not onely of the Mannor it selfe, but of

    the