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  • Title: The Honest Whore, Part 1 (Quarto 2, 1604)
  • Editor: Joost Daalder
  • ISBN: 978-1-55058-490-5

    Copyright Digital Renaissance Editions. This text may be freely used for educational, non-profit purposes; for all other uses contact the Editor.
    Authors: Thomas Dekker, Thomas Middleton
    Editor: Joost Daalder
    Peer Reviewed

    The Honest Whore, Part 1 (Quarto 2, 1604)

    The conuerted Courtizan.
    And on your eye-lids hang so heauily,
    They haue no power to looke so high as heauen,
    Youde sit and muse on nothing but despayre,
    Curse that deuil Lu st , that so burnes vp your blood,
    1175And in ten thousand shiuers breake your gla s s e
    For his temptation. Say you ta ste delight,
    To haue a golden Gull from rize to Set,
    To meat you in his hote luxurious armes,
    Yet your nights pay for all: I know you dreame
    1180Of warrants, whips, & Beadles, and then start
    At a dores windy creake: thinke euery Weezle
    To be a Con stable: and euery Rat
    A long tayld Officer: Are you now not slaues?
    Oh you haue damnation without pleasure for it!
    1185Such is the state of Harlots. To conclude,
    When you are old, and can well paynt no more,
    You turne Bawd, and are then worse then before:
    Make vse of this: farewell.
    Bel. Oh, I pray stay.
    1190 Hip. I see Matheo comes not: time hath bard me,
    Would all the Harlots in the towne had heard me. Exit.
    Bel. Stay yet a little longer. no: quite gone!
    Cur st be that minute (for it was no more.
    So soone a mayd is chang'd into a Whore)
    1195Wherein I fir st fell, be it for euer blacke;
    Yet why should sweet Hipolito shun mine eyes;
    For whose true loue I would becom pure-hone st,
    Hate the worlds mixtures, & the smiles of gold:
    Am I not fayre? Why should he flye me then?
    1200Faire creatures are de sir'd, not scornd of men.
    How many Gallants haue drunk healthes to me,
    Out of their daggerd armes, & thought thē ble st,
    Enioying but mine eyes at prodigall fea sts!
    And does Hipolito dete st my loue?
    1205Oh, sure their heedle s s e lu sts but flattred me,
    I am not plea sing, beautifull nor young.
    Hipolito hath spyed some vgly blemi sh,
    Eclip sing all my beauties: I am foule: