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  • Title: The Honest Whore, Part 1 (Quarto 1, 1604)
  • Editor: Joost Daalder
  • ISBN: 978-1-55058-490-5

    Copyright Digital Renaissance Editions. This text may be freely used for educational, non-profit purposes; for all other uses contact the Editor.
    Authors: Thomas Dekker, Thomas Middleton
    Editor: Joost Daalder
    Peer Reviewed

    The Honest Whore, Part 1 (Quarto 1, 1604)

    1480 SCENA 8.
    Enter a Bawd and Roger.
    Bawd. O Roger, Roger, where's your mi stris, wher's your
    mi stris? there's the fine st, neate st Gentleman at my house,
    but newly come ouer: O where is she, where is she, where
    1485is she?
    Rog. My mi stris is abroad, but not among st em: my mi-
    stris is not the whore now that you take her for.
    Baw. How? is she not a whore? do you go about to take
    away her good name, Roger? you are a fine Pandar indeed.
    1490 Rog. I tell you, Madona Finger-locke, I am not sad for
    nothing, I ha not eaten one good meale this three & thir-
    ty dayes: I had wont to get sixteene pence by fetching a
    pottle of Hypocras: but now those dayes are pa st: we had
    as good doings, Madona Finger-locke, she within dores and
    1495I without, as any poore yong couple in Millain.
    Baw. Gods my life, and is she chang'd now?
    Rog. I ha lo st by her squeami shne s s e, more then would
    haue builded 12. bawdy houses.
    And had she no time to turn hone st but now? what a vile
    1500woman is this? twenty pound a night, Ile be sworne, Roger,
    in good gold and no siluer: why here was a time, if she
    should ha pickt out a time, it could not be better! gold y-
    nough stirring; choyce of men, choyce of haire, choyce of
    beards, choyce of legs, and choyce of euery, euery, euery
    1505thing: it cannot sink into my head, that she should be such
    an A s s e. Roger, I neuer beleeue it.
    Rog. Here she comes now. Enter Bellafronte.
    Baw. O sweet Madona, on with your loose gowne, your
    felt & your feather, there's the sweete st, propre st, gallante st
    1510Gentleman at my house, he smells all of Muske & Amber
    greece, his pocket full of Crownes, flame-colourd dublet,
    red satin hose, Carnation silk stockins, and a leg and a bo-
    dy, oh!
    Bel. Hence, thou our sexes mon ster, poysonous Bawd,
    1515Lu sts Factor, and damnations Orator,
    Go s sip of hell, were all the Harlots sinnes
    Which the whole world conteynes, numbred together,
    Thine farre exceeds them all; of all the creatures
    That euer were created, thou art base st:
    1520What serpent would beguile thee of thy Office?
    It is dete stable: for thou liu' st
    Vpon the dregs of Harlots, guard' st the dore,
    Whil st couples goe to dauncing: O course deuill!
    Thou art the ba stards curse, thou brand st his birth,
    1525The lechers French disease; for thou dry-suck st him:
    The Harlots poyson, and thine owne confu sion.
    Baw. Mary come vp with a pox, haue you no body to
    raile again st, but your Bawd now?
    Bel. And you, Knaue Pandar, kinsman to a Bawd.
    1530 Rog. You and I Madona, are Cozens.
    Bel. Of the same bloud and making, neere allyed,
    Thou, that slaue to sixpence, base-mettald villayne.
    Rog. Sixpence? nay that's not so; I neuer took vnder two
    shillings foure pence, I hope I know my fee.
    1535 Bel. I know not again st which mo st to inueigh:
    For both of you are damnd so equally.
    Thou neuer spar' st for oathes: swear st any thing,
    As if thy soule were made of shoe-leather.
    God dam me, Gentleman, if she be within,
    1540When in the next roome she's found dallying.
    Rog. If it be my vocation to sweare, euery man in his vo-
    cation: I hope my betters sweare and dam themselues, and
    why should not I? Bel. Roger, you cheat kind gentlemen?
    Rog. The more gulls they.
    1545 Bel. Slaue, I ca sheere thee.
    Baw. And you do ca sheere him, he shalbe entertaynd.
    Rog. Shall I? then blurt a your seruice.
    Bel. As hell would haue it, entertaynd by you!
    I dare the deuill himselfe to match those two. Exit.
    1550 Baw. Mary gup, are you growne so holy, so pure, so ho-
    ne st with a pox?
    Rog. Scuruy hone st Punck! But stay Madona, how mu st
    our agreement be now? for you know I am to haue all the
    commings in at the hall dore, & you at the chamber dore.
    1555 Ba. True Rog. except my vailes. Rog. Vailes, what vailes?
    Ba. Why as thus, if a couple come in a Coach, & light to
    lie down a little, then Roger, thats my fee, & you may walk
    abroad; for the Coach man himselfe is their Pandar.
    Ro. Is a so? in truth I haue almo st forgot, for want of ex-
    1560ercise: But how if I fetch this Citizens wife to that Gull, &
    that Madona to that Gallant, how then?
    Ba. Why then, Roger, you are to haue sixpence a lane,
    so many lanes, so many sixpences.
    Ro. I st so? thē I see we two shall agree and liue together.
    1565 Ba. I Roger, so long as there be any Tauernes and baw-
    dy houses in Millain. Exeunt.