Digital Renaissance Editions

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Performance Board

Susan Bond, University of Toronto

Terri Bourus, Indiana University–Purdue University, Indianapolis

Peter Cockett, McMaster University

Rob Conkie, La Trobe University

Alex Cox, University of Colorado, Boulder

Sarah Enloe, American Shakespeare Center

Alexa Huang, George Washington University

Peter Kirwan, University of Nottingham

Toby Malone, University of Waterloo

Perry Mills, King Edward VI School, Stratford-upon-Avon

Paige Newmark, ShakespeareWA and University of Notre Dame Australia

Kimberly Newton, American Shakespeare Center

Jennifer Roberts-Smith, University of Waterloo

Eleanor Rycroft, University of Bristol

Charlene V. Smith, Brave Spirits Theatre

Board Member Profiles

Susan Bond, University of Toronto

Susan Bond is a freelance classical production dramaturg based in Toronto, Canada. Her work in production has been primarily in Renaissance plays, with a focus on textual preparation. She has a BA in Linguistics and an MA in English, both from the University of Toronto, where she works as the circulation supervisor of the John W. Graham Library.

Terri Bourus, Indiana University–Purdue University, Indianapolis

Terri Bourus is Associate Professor of English Drama at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis. A bibliographer, textual editor, and performer, her primary research focuses on the print and performance of early modern drama. Terri is Director and a General Editor of the New Oxford Shakespeare Project, as well as Founding Director of the project's performance arm, Hoosier Bard Productions. In addition to numerous articles on early modern drama, her publications include The King's Players and Players' Printers (forthcoming), editions of Hamlet and A Midsummer Night's Dream for the Sourcebooks Shakespeare series, and editions of Kyd, Barnes, Marston, and Beaumont and Fletcher for The Compendium of Renaissance Drama.

Peter Cockett, McMaster University

Peter Cockett is Assistant Professor in Theatre and Film Studies at McMaster University, teaching acting, directing, and new work creation. His research is performance-centered and he is a specialist in medieval and early modern theatre. In addition to various roles as actor and directing productions for the Shakespeare and the Queen’s Men project, he has directed research-creation productions of the Digby Mary Magdalene (2003), George Peele’s The Old Wives Tale (2004), and the Chester Last Judgment (2010), in addition to adaptations of Henry V and Hamlet at McMaster University. In 2006, he also directed his own adaptation of Shakespeare’s Macbeth for the Toronto Fringe Festival, entitled Macbeth’s Kitchen.

Rob Conkie, La Trobe University

Rob Conkie is Senior Lecturer in Theatre and Drama at La Trobe University. His teaching and research incorporate both practical and theoretical approaches to Shakespeare and Renaissance drama in performance. His 2006 monograph The Globe Theatre Project: Shakespeare and Authenticity addresses the question of why authenticity has become so crucial in late twentieth and early twenty-first century Britain and what productions of authentic Shakespeare say about contemporary identities. His second monograph, Writing Performative Shakespeares: New Forms for Performance Criticism, is forthcoming from Cambridge University Press.

Alex Cox, University of Colorado, Boulder

Alex Cox is a narrative feature film director, screenwriter, and actor from Liverpool, England. He studied film at Bristol University and at UCLA. Among his films are Repo Man, Sid & Nancy, Walker, Highway Patrolman, The Revengers Tragedy, and Searchers 2.0. He has shot films in Nicaragua, Mexico, Spain, Holland, and Japan, and screened them, in and out of competition, at Venice, Cannes, Berlin, Tokyo, Rotterdam, Toronto and other festivals. Most of his films and screenplays are archived at the National Media Museum in Bradford, England. He is also an Assistant Professor in the Film Studies program at the University of Colorado, Boulder.

Sarah Enloe, American Shakespeare Center

Sarah Enloe is Director of Education at the American Shakespeare Center. She holds a Master of Fine Arts with an emphasis in dramaturgy, a Master of Letters with an emphasis in teaching from Mary Baldwin College’s Shakespeare and Performance Program, and a B.F.A. in theatre studies from the University of Texas at Austin. Sarah taught theatre arts at the high school level in Texas for five years, and in 2003, she won recognition as teacher of the year and an NEH fellowship to study with Shakespeare & Co. At the American Shakespeare Center, Sarah directs programming for in the areas of College Prep, Research and Scholarship (including facilitating the ASC’s partnership with Mary Baldwin College’s Masters in Shakespeare and Performance Program), Personal Renaissance, and Educator Resources. She serves on the Advisory board of The Shakespeare Factory, the Editorial Board of the online journal This Rough Magic, and is on the executive board of the Shakespeare Theatre Association. Sarah’s current work is focused on the practical application of performance techniques for the English classroom.

Alexa Huang, George Washington University

Alexa Huang is the recipient of the MLA’s Aldo and Jeanne Scaglione Prize, research affiliate in literature at MIT, and Director of the Dean’s Scholars in Shakespeare Program, Director of Graduate Studies, Founding Co-director of the Digital Humanities Institute, and Professor of English at George Washington University in Washington, D.C. where she is affiliated with the Medieval and Early Modern Studies Institute (MEMSI), Sigur Center for Asian Studies, and Departments of Theatre and Dance, East Asian Languages and Literatures, and Elliott School of International Affairs. With fellowship support from the ACLS, ISA, Folger Institute, and other agencies, she has published widely on Shakespeare, performance, digital humanities, and globalization. She has also been involved in the larger artistic and academic communities to promote cross-cultural understanding through Shakespeare and Renaissance drama in her roles as a General Editor of The Shakespearean International Yearbook, Performance Editor of the Internet Shakespeare Editions, chair of the MLA committee on the New Variorum Edition of Shakespeare, and co-founder and co-editor of Global Shakespeares.

Peter Kirwan, University of Nottingham

Peter Kirwan is Associate Professor of Early Modern Drama at the University of Nottingham. He is the author of Shakespeare and the Idea of Apocrypha (Cambridge, 2015) and Associate Editor of William Shakespeare and Others: Collaborative Plays (Basingstoke, 2013), and has published extensively on plays attributed to Shakespeare but excluded from the traditional canon. He is co-editor of Shakespeare and the Digital World (Cambridge, 2014), Book Reviews Editor for Early Theatre and Editions Reviewer for Shakespeare Survey, and sits on the editorial boards of Apocrypha Redivivus, Shakespeare and Digital Renaissance Editions. His reviews of contemporary performance of Shakespeare and his contemporaries are archived on The Bardathon, and he is currently writing a monograph on the theatre company Cheek by Jowl.

Toby Malone, The Unit Dramaturgy Collective and University of Waterloo

Toby Malone is a graduate of the University of Western Australia and the University of Toronto. He has spent his career dividing time between his scholarship on dramaturgical adaptations of Shakespeare’s texts, and a career as a professional actor and dramaturg. Toby’s professional publications include pieces in Literature/Film Quarterly, Canadian Theatre Research, and Shakespeare Survey, along with chapters in forthcoming collections with Ashgate and Routledge. Toby is based in Toronto, where he is Artistic Director of The Unit Dramaturgy Collective. He is currently a Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Waterloo's Department of Drama and Speech Communication, co-funded by Mitacs-Accelerate and the Stratford Festival.

Perry Mills, King Edward VI School, Stratford-upon-Avon

Perry Mills is Deputy Headmaster at King Edward VI School, Stratford-upon-Avon. He is an experienced leader of workshops for teachers and students on a variety of topics relating to the teaching of English and Drama in secondary schools. He edited The Taming of the Shrew for the Cambridge School Shakespeare series and wrote the Cambridge Shakespeare Student Guide on As You Like It. Throughout his career he has directed plays and in recent years developed Edward’s Boys, an all-boy company comprising members of the school, in order to explore the neglected repertoire of plays written for the boys’ companies around the turn of the seventeenth century.

Paige Newmark, ShakespeareWA and University of Notre Dame Australia

Paige Newmark is currently Artistic Director of Western Australia’s classical theatre company, Shakespeare WA. He has directed theatre all over the world, including England, Australia, South Africa, and throughout the USA. Acting credits include David Zucker’s film For Goodness Sake, a brief appearance in Frank Marshall’s Roller Coaster Rabbit, and the BBC’s Kavanaugh QC. In addition to his theatrical work, Paige is also an academic who has taught and lectured at numerous institutions, including the University of Oxford, Stanford University, Williams University, UCLA, USC, Rhodes University (South Africa), the Shakespeare Association (India), and more locally at the Universities of Western Australia and Notre Dame, where he is Adjunct Professor of Theatre. He is currently an Editorial Consultant for the journal Shakespeare in Southern Africa. In July 2008 he published a chapter on maps and Marlowe in a new book entitled Renaissance Poetry and Drama in Context.

Kimberly Newton, American Shakespeare Center

Kim Newton is the Director of College Prep Programs at the American Shakespeare Center. She directs the ASC Theater Camp, an intensive summer performance program for students aged 13 to 18, and she manages the ASC Education Residency Program. She holds a Master of Letters degree in Shakespeare and Performance from Mary Baldwin College and a BA in Theatre from Hunter College, CUNY. Kim’s performance focus is on practice-based research and directing early modern drama. 

Jennifer Roberts-Smith, University of Waterloo

Jennifer Roberts-Smith is Assistant Professor of Drama at the University of Waterloo, Ontario, Canada, and Principal Investigator of the SSHRC-funded Simulated Environment for Theatre (SET) project. She serves as Associate Co-editor, Performance for Queen’s Men Editions (QME), and is currently editing old- and modern-spelling performance editions of The True Tragedie of Richard the Third for QME. She also publishes on early English theatre history, Shakespeare’s language, and theatre pedagogy, and maintains her practice as a theatre director and dramaturge.

Eleanor Rycroft, University of Bristol

Eleanor Rycroft is Lecturer in Theatre and Performance Studies at the University of Bristol. She is a Research Fellow on the AHRC-funded "Staging and Representing the Scottish Renaissance Court" project, based at the University of Edinburgh. She has particular interests in research-through-practice, the social and political contexts of the theatre, and early modern sexual identity and sexuality. Following an appointment on the Staging the Henrician Court project, her work also focuses on the early Tudor theatre.

Charlene V. Smith, Brave Spirits Theatre

Charlene V. Smith is the Artistic Director of Brave Spirits Theatre. She has a BA in English and Theatre from the College of William and Mary and an MLitt and MFA in Shakespeare and Performance from Mary Baldwin College in partnership with the American Shakespeare Center. She was the head editor on a book of essays produced by her MFA class, Rogue Shakespeare: Stagecraft and Scholarship in an Ensemble-Based MFA Company. With Brave Spirits, she has directed Richard III and The Two Noble Kinsmen, and co-directed the first modern professional production of Middleton and Dekker’s The Bloody Banquet.