Digital Renaissance Editions

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Advisory Board

The following distinguished international scholars, technologists, and designers have agreed to serve on the Advisory Board for the Digital Renaissance Editions:

Frank Ardolino, University of Hawai’i

David Bevington, University of Chicago

Tom Blake, Boston Public Library

A. R. Braunmuller, University of California, Lose Angeles

Alan Brissenden, University of Adelaide

Hardy M. Cook III, Bowie State University

Joost Daalder, Flinders University

Frances E. Dolan, University of California, Davis

Richard Dutton, Ohio State University

Laura Estill Texas A&M University

Charles R. ForkerIndiana University

Peter Groves, Monash University

Ton Hoenselaars, Utrecht University

Jean E. Howard, Columbia University

MacDonald P. Jackson, University of Auckland

Michael S. Joyce, University of British Columbia

David Scott Kastan, Yale University

Anne Lancashire, University of Toronto

Roberta Livingstone, Internet Shakespeare Editions

Shawn Martin, Van Pelt Library, University of Pennsylvania

Kate McLuskie, University of Birmingham

Andrew McRae, University of Exeter

Stephen Orgel, Stanford University

Aaron T. Pratt, Harry Ransom Center, University of Texas at Austin

Richard Rowland, University of York

Pip Willcox, Bodleian Libraries, University of Oxford

Board Member Profiles

Frank Ardolino, University of Hawai'i

Frank Ardolino is Professor of English at the University of Hawai’i. He has published two books on Thomas Kyd’s The Spanish Tragedy. He has also written numerous articles on Renaissance literature and drama, modern drama, film, sports literature and film, and Hawaiian sports history. In addition, he has published play, film, and book reviews in Shakespeare Bulletin, Sixteenth Century Journal, Shakespeare Newsletter, Renaissance Quarterly, and Nine.

David Bevington, University of Chicago

David Bevington is Phyllis Fay Horton Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus in the Humanities at the University of Chicago, where he has taught since 1967. He is a General Editor of the Revels Plays, Revels Student Editions, and the forthcoming Cambridge edition of The Works of Ben Jonson. His most recent books include Murder Most Foul: “Hamlet” Through the Ages (2011), Shakespeare and Biography (2011), Shakespeare’s Ideas: More Things in Heaven and Earth (2008), and This Wide and Universal Theater: Shakespeare in Performance Then and Now (2007). He has edited early English plays for The Norton Anthology of Renaissance Drama (2002), Medieval Drama (1975), and the Revels Plays, as well as the Bantam, Arden, New Cambridge, and Oxford Shakespeare series.

A. R. Braunmuller, University of California, Los Angeles

A. R. Braunmuller is Distinguished Professor of English at the University of California, Los Angeles. In addition to numerous articles on Renaissance and modern dramatists, he has edited several plays by Shakespeare and his contemporaries. He has published a critical study of George Peele (1983) and A Seventeenth-Century Letter-Book (1983), an edition and study of a manuscript containing numerous original items by George Chapman and Ben Jonson. With Michael Hattaway, he co-edited and contributed to The Cambridge Companion to English Renaissance Drama. He is Associate General Editor of the New Cambridge Shakespeare and General Editor of the New Pelican Shakespeare.

Tom Blake, Boston Public Library

Tom Blake has been working at the Boston Public Library as their Digital Imaging Production Manager and Digital Projects Manager since 2005. He is currently responsible for the creation of beautiful, versatile, and sustainable digital objects for all BPL digital initiatives. Since 2010, he has managed an ambitious project to help digitize collections from across Massachusetts in conjunction with Digital Commonwealth, a statewide repository service, and as a pilot Service Hub of the Digital Public Library of America. Tom came to the BPL from the Massachusetts Historical Society, where he was involved in several digital projects including the online version of the diaries of John Quincy Adams. He also served as a photographer and imaging specialist for nine years at Boston Photo Imaging and as an archives assistant at the MIT Special Collections and Archives. Tom holds a BFA in Professional Photographic Illustration from the Rochester Institute of Technology, and an MS in Library and Information Science with a concentration in Archives Management from Simmons College.

Alan Brissenden, University of Adelaide

Alan Brissenden is Honorary Visiting Research Fellow of the University of Adelaide. He has been commenting on Australian and international dance since 1950, and currently writes and reviews for The Australian, Dance Australia, The Adelaide Review and Radio Adelaide and edits Brolga, the scholarly journal of the Australian Dance Council. His numerous publications include Shakespeare and the Dance (1981), an edition of As You Like It for the Oxford Shakespeare (1993), and entries for The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2001). He was made a Member of the Order of Australia (AM) for services to the Arts in 1996.

Hardy M. Cook III, Bowie State University

Hardy M. Cook is Professor Emeritus of English at Bowie State University. He has authored a number of papers on subjects ranging from Shakespeare on television to the editing of electronic texts. He is co-editor (with Ian Lancashire) of Shake-speares Sonnets and Louers Complaint for the Renaissance Electronic Texts. For his work with SHAKSPER, the international electronic conference for Shakespearean researchers, instructors, students, and those who share their academic interests and concerns, and for his other scholarly activities, Dr Cook received the University System of Maryland's Board of Regents’ Award for Excellence in Scholarship/Research/Creative Activities in 1999.

Joost Daalder, Flinders University

Joost Daalder is Professor Emeritus of English at Flinders University. He has edited Thomas Middleton and William Rowley’s The Changeling (1990) and Jasper Heywood’s translation of Thyestes (1982) for The New Mermaids, and the Oxford Standard Authors edition of Sir Thomas Wyatt’s poems (1975). He is editing Thomas Dekker’s The Honest Whore, Parts 1 and 2 for the Digital Renaissance Editions.

Frances E. Dolan, University of California, Davis

Frances E. Dolan is Professor of English at the University of California, Davis. She has held fellowships from the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities (at the Newberry Library and the Folger Library), and the Monticello College Foundation. In 2004-5, she served as the President of the Shakespeare Association of America. Her publications include Marriage and Violence: The Early Modern Legacy (2008), Whores of Babylon: Catholicism, Gender, and Seventeenth-Century Print Culture (1999), Dangerous Familiars: Representations of Domestic Crime in England, 1500-1700 (1994), as well as editions of plays for the New Pelican and Bedford Shakespeare series.

Richard Dutton, Ohio State University

Richard Dutton is Humanities Distinguished Professor of English at Ohio State University. He has published widely on censorship of Renaissance Drama, and is well known as a scholar of Ben Jonson and as an editor of Jonson’s works. He has edited Jonson’s Volpone for The Cambridge Edition of the Works of Ben Jonson (2012) and Epicene for the Revels Plays (2003), as well as Jacobean Civic Pageants (1995) and Thomas Middleton’s Women Beware Women and Other Plays (1999). He is a General Editor of the Revels Plays, and was General Editor of the Macmillan Literary Lives series.

Laura Estill Texas A&M University

Laura Estill is Assistant Professor of Digital Shakespeare at Texas A&M University. She is Editor of the World Shakespeare Bibliography and DEx: A Database of Dramatic Extracts. Her book, Dramatic Extracts in Seventeenth-Century English Manuscripts: Watching, Reading, Changing Plays is forthcoming from the University of Delaware Press. She was previously a Banting Postdoctoral Fellow in the Electronic Textual Cultures Lab, University of Victoria, and a Visiting Assistant Professor at the Université de Moncton, Campus d'Edmundston.

Charles R. ForkerIndiana University

Charles R. Forker was Professor Emeritus of English at Indiana University, where he taught from 1968 until his passing in 2014. He held visiting professorships at the University of Michigan, Dartmouth College, and Concordia University. He edited Shakespeare’s Henry V (1971) and Richard II (2002) for the Blackfriars and Arden series, Marlowe’s Edward II (1994) and Peele’s Troublesome Reign of King John for the Revels Plays, as well as an edition of Shirley’s The Cardinal (1964). In addition to numerous articles, he was the author of The Skull Beneath the Skin: The Achievement of John Webster (1986) and Fancy’s Images (1990).

Peter Groves Monash University

Peter Groves was born in Shropshire and educated at the universities of Exeter and Cambridge. He teaches poetry and Renaissance literature at Monash University in Melbourne, and has published two books on metre – including Rhythm and Meaning in Shakespeare (2013) – and a range of articles on poets from Chaucer to Philip Larkin.

Ton Hoenselaars, Utrecht University

Ton Hoenselaars is Professor of Early Modern English Literature and Culture at Utrecht University. He is the founding Chairman of the Shakespeare Society of the Low Countries and President of the European Shakespeare Research Association. He is the 2012 Sam Wanamaker Fellow at Shakespeare's Globe London. He is the author of Images of Englishmen and Foreigners in the Drama of Shakespeare and His Contemporaries (1992), and is currently writing a monograph study of Shakespeare and World War I.

Jean E. Howard, Columbia University

Jean E. Howard is George Delacorte Professor in the Humanities and Chair of the Department of English and Comparative Literature at Columbia University. She is an Editor of the Norton Shakespeare (2nd ed, 2008) and General Editor of the Bedford Shakespeare series. Her books include Shakespeare's Art of Orchestration (1984), The Stage and Social Struggle in Early Modern England (1994), Engendering a Nation: A Feminist Account of Shakespeare’s English Histories (1997; with Phyllis Rackin), and Theater of a City: The Places of London Comedy 1598-1642 (2007). She was President of the Shakespeare Association of America (1999-2000), and served as Columbia’s first Vice Provost for Diversity Initiatives (2004-2007).

MacDonald P. Jackson, University of Auckland

MacDonald P. Jackson is Professor Emeritus of English at the University of Auckland. His publications include twelve books, as author or editor, and some two hundred contributions to books and academic journals, mainly on early modern drama. He is the author of Defining Shakespeare: ‘Pericles’ as Test Case (2003) and one of three Editors of the second (2003), third (2007), and fourth (forthcoming) volumes of the Cambridge edition of The Works of John Webster. He served as an Associate General Editor for the Oxford Thomas Middleton: The Collected Works (2007) and its companion, Thomas Middleton and Early Modern Textual Culture (2007), editing The Revenger’s Tragedy. In 2008 he was made a Fellow of the New Zealand Academy of the Humanities (FNZAH) and in 2009 a Fellow of the Royal Society of New Zealand (FRSNZ).

Michael S. Joyce, University of British Columbia

Michael S. Joyce is Technical Director of the Internet Shakespeare Editions, where he has overseen web design and development since 2005. He has previously served as Web Application Project Coordinator at the University of British Columbia, and Programmer Analyst and Developer for the Electronic Textual Cultures Lab, University of Victoria.

David Scott Kastan, Yale University

David Scott Kastan is George M. Bodman Professor of English at Yale University and Honorary Research Professor of University College London. He is a General Editor of the Arden Shakespeare (1995-) and Series Editor of the Barnes & Noble Shakespeare (2006-). He was General Editor of The Oxford Encyclopedia of British Literature (2006), and Co-Editor of the Gobe Quartos (1999-2003) and Bantam Shakespeare (2004-) series. He has edited Marlowe’s Doctor Faustus (2005) for the Norton Critical Editions, Shakespeare’s 1 Henry IV (2002) for the Arden Shakespeare, and Brome’s The Antipodes (2000; co-edited) for the Globe Quartos. His books include Shakespeare and the Shapes of Time (1982), Shakespeare and the Book (2001), and Shakespeare after Theory (1999). He is also editor or co-editor of A Companion to Shakespeare (1999), The New History of Early English Drama (1994), and Staging the Renaissance (1991).

Anne Lancashire, University of Toronto

Anne Lancashire is Professor of English, cross-appointed to both Cinema Studies and to Drama, at the University of Toronto. She has edited Lyly’s Gallathea and Midas for the Regent’s Renaissance Drama series, and Middleton’s The Second Maiden’s Tragedy for the Revels Plays. Her edition of the anonymous Look About You, prepared as her doctoral thesis at Harvard, will be published by the Digital Renaissance Editions. She is the author of London Civic Theatre: City Drama and Pageantry from Roman Times to 1558 (2002), and The Mayors and Sheriffs of London, an open-access scholarly database of London mayors and sheriffs to 1558 (first published in print by Oxford UP) to be expanded to the present time. Her three-volume edition of London civic manuscript records of drama, pageantry, and music, 1275 to 1558, is forthcoming from the Records of Early English Drama.

Roberta Livingstone, Internet Shakespeare Editions

Roberta Livingstone is Vice President and Creative Director of the Internet Shakespeare Editions. A professional writer and editor, Roberta Livingstone brings almost twenty years experience in writing, project management, strategic communications and graphic design to the Internet Shakespeare Editions. A graduate of the University of Victoria in Fine Arts and English, Livingstone has worked for a variety of organizations including non-profits and federal and provincial governments and has written almost every kind of document from ministerial speeches to judicial reports to cabinet documents for new legislation.

Shawn Martin, University of Pennsylvania

Shawn Martin is Scholarly Communication Librarian at the Van Pelt Library of the University of Pennsylvania. He has a BA in history from Ohio State University and an MA in history from the College of William and Mary. He has worked for several years in digital libraries including the Digital Library Project at the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, the Ohio Memory Project at the Ohio Historical Society, and, most recently, the Text Creation Partnership at the University of Michigan. Shawn is also active in several library and scholarly associations and serves as the Executive Director of the American Association for History and Computing.

Kate McLuskie, University of Birmingham

Kate McLuskie is Professor Emeritus of English and Honorary Fellow of the Shakespeare Institute, University of Birmingham, of which she was previously Director. She is a Governor of the Royal Shakespeare Company, a Trustee of the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust, and a Board Member of the British Library. In addition to numerous articles and chapters, she has co-edited a volume of Plays on Women (1999) for the Revels Student Editions, and is author of Renaissance Dramatists: Feminist Readings (1989) and Dekker and Heywood: Professional Dramatists (1994).

Andrew McRae, University of Exeter

Andrew McRae is Professor of Renaissance Studies and Associate Dean, Education, for the College of Humanities at the University of Exeter. His publications include God Speed the Plough: The Representation of Agrarian England, 1500-1660 (1996), Renaissance Drama (2003), Literature, Satire and the Early Stuart State (2004), and Literature and Domestic Travel in Early Modern England (2009). He is also Co-Editor of Early Stuart Libels: An Edition of Poetry from Manuscript Sources (2005).

Stephen Orgel, Stanford University

Stephen Orgel is Jackson Eli Reynolds Professor of Humanities at Stanford University. He has has published widely on the political and historical aspects of Renaissance literature, theater, art history and the history of the book. His publications include Imagining Shakespeare (2003), The Authentic Shakespeare (2002), Impersonations: The Performance of Gender in Shakespeare’s England (1996), The Illusion of Power (1975), Inigo Jones (1973; co-authored), and The Jonsonian Masque (1965). He is General Editor of the New Pelican Shakespeare and was Series Editor of Cambridge Studies in Renaissance Literature and Culture. He has edited Jonson’s masques for the Yale Ben Jonson, as well as The Tempest and The Winter’s Tale for the Oxford Shakespeare. He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Aaron T. Pratt, Harry Ransom Center, University of Texas at Austin

Aaron T. Pratt is Carl and Lily Pforzheimer Curator of Early Books and Manuscripts at the Harry Ransom Center, University of Texas at Austin. His research focuses on English literature of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, bibliography, and the history of the book. He has published a study of early modern bookbinding practices, Holinshed's Chronicles, and early modern English Bibles. He has worked in the private sector as a network and systems engineer, a database administrator, and a project manager, and previously had a small business as an antiquarian bookseller.

Richard Rowland, University of York

Richard Rowland is Senior Lecturer in English and Related Literature at the University of York, which he joined in 2001 after a decade of teaching at the University of Oxford. He has edited plays by Marlowe for the Oxford Complete Works, Chapman and Jonson for the Penguin Renaissance Dramatists series, and Heywood’s Edward IV for the Revels Plays. He is the author of Thomas Heywood’s Theatre, 1599-1639: Locations, Translations and Conflict (2010), and is currently working on a study of the reception and reinvention of ancient drama.

Pip Willcox, Bodleian Libraries, University of Oxford

Pip Willcox is a digital editor and project manager at the Bodleian Libraries at the University of Oxford. Pip works as part of a team within Bodleian Digital Library Systems and Services supporting research, offering consultancy, and enabling online access to rare books and manuscripts. Recent collaborative projects include Early English Books Online Text Creation Partnership, the Shakespeare Quartos Archive and the public funding campaign Sprint for Shakespeare. She sits on the Organizational Committee of the annual Digital.Humanities @ Oxford Summer School, and convenes the HEIF5+-funded Cultural Connections course on public engagement skills for knowledge exchange.